Thought You Should See This, September 2nd, 2011

This week’s Thought You Should See This update for my pals at Doblin.

Doblin and Monitor Innovation chief, Bansi Nagji gets top billing this week, for a piece he and I co-authored for Rotman Magazine. Flipping Orthodoxies: Overcoming Insidious Obstacles to Innovation takes a look at those tightly held beliefs that both direct how an organization runs–and often get in its way.

Also this week on Thought You Should See This:

Olafur Eliasson is best known for large-scale art installations. Now he’s responsible for the facade of a new concert hall in Iceland’s capital city, Reykjavik (shown above.) Critics are impressed, while I wondered about Eliasson’s description of “the brutality of clients”–and what that means for other designers.

David Brooks penned a lovely New York Times op ed at how we so often miss the point of what’s really important in life: experiences are important, not things. Praising the piece then led to my being savaged on Twitter.

Email was copyrighted 29 years ago, by the then-16 year old prodigy, V. A. Shiva, who now teaches a wonderful sounding class at MIT.

Cory Doctorow wrote a thunderous piece, Google Plus Forces Us to Discuss Identity, in which he took the search giant to task for following in the footsteps of Facebook.

Video of a British grad student project looking at the potential positive impact smart design might have for those suffering from dementia.

Former Intel chief, Andy Grove sounded off about the state of American manufacturing.

Chipotle produced a beautiful animation spot promoting a sustainable lifestyle (with a Coldplay cover by Willie Nelson.)

Another small design outfit released its ingenious idea for a self-inflating bicycle tire.

Al Lewis wrote a tragicomic piece outlining the borderline insane decisions that Hewlett-Packard leadership has made in the last year.

Investor Fred Destin mulled the fact that premature scaling all too often kills startups stone dead.

[Image c/o Harpa.]

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