A love note to Twitter

I have an essay in Matt May‘s upcoming book, The Laws of Subtraction: 6 Simple Rules For Winning In The Age Of Excess Everything, which will be published by McGraw-Hill in October. I’m looking forward to seeing the final book; for now, MM gave me permission to feature my short essay, a love note of sorts to Twitter.

The first time I saw Twitter being used in the wild was a strange experience. It was 2007. I sat next to a guy I knew in the auditorium of a conference and watched, confused, as he tapped into his laptop: “Sitting with Helen Walters from BusinessWeek.” Why is that interesting? I asked him. “It’s not, really,” he answered, shrugging. So I gave him what I hoped was my most withering look and then turned my attention to the stage to focus on writing and reporting in the traditional way I had long understood.

Since then I’ve come to appreciate the 140-character medium. Twitter seems to embody the essence of subtraction. The brevity forces you to focus on what’s truly important and to harness the restrictions as a challenge. The exercise of paring down meaning and insight into its purest form, formerly the purview of headline writers and the copy desk, is an invaluable one for anyone looking to communicate in the modern world. Such focused, clear thinking feeds back into the writing and thinking of a longer article, too.

In the years since I signed up for the service (in 2008, still reluctant, still grumpy, quickly addicted) I have marveled at the way in which this simple service has aided my writing, my thinking, my network, and my life. Many people seem to have constructed complex theories about the best ways to use it. My own philosophy aims to ape the simplicity of the service itself: don’t overthink things. I tune in when I can; I write what I think; I engage with those I feel are real; I don’t sweat the number of people following me; and I don’t talk about what I had for lunch unless it was genuinely remarkable.

As the years have passed, the service has created new relationships, strengthened old ones, given me space to think aloud and to ask for feedback or critique. (And boy, do people deliver.) I have watched breaking news stories unfold; I have cried over updates from people I’ve never met; I’ve been guided to stories I would never have seen; and I’ve been introduced to incredible people I’d never have known were it not for this powerful yet brilliantly simple form of expression. 

I know that many people still don’t get Twitter and there’s certainly still time for the company to take a wrong turn, to pollute its purity with some bad business decisions. But for me, as a writer, I’m hugely grateful for the focus and clarity it has afforded my life. #Thanks.

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Thought You Should See This, August 10th, 2012

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The eagle-eyed among you will have noticed there hasn’t been a Thought You Should See This update for a while. That’s because I’m working on a book at the moment and wrangling with how to manage a fierce deadline alongside writing the blog. Safe to say, this is an imperfect science, so updates will likely be a little more haphazard over the next month or so. For now, a bumper crop of stories here for your delectation:

Amazon will pay up to 95% of the tuition, textbook and associated fees for its employees’ continuing education, in the e-tail giant’s new push to invest in vocational training.

This is wonderful: an interactive book review written in Javascript. Beautifully done by Robin Sloan. (Screenshot above.)

Chip Kidd’s proposed ad designs for New York’s subway cards. Charming.

My friend, the designer Brian Collins goes postal on a New York restaurant for its terrible service. Social media mayhem ensues.

Hello Health founder Dr Jay Parkinson has a new venture in the works. Watch a CBS News interview with him talking about Sherpaa, a startup looking to disrupt the bloated, creaking, existing healthcare system in the United States. (Well, New York for starters.) 

Irreverent swag commemorating the Olympic Games in London. Example slogan: “They’re all on steroids.” (Also, yes I am available for comment on the Opening Ceremony. TL;DR Yay British weirdness!)

Designer Stephen Doyle conducts a paper chair into existence in this adorable video.

The Joy of Missing Out, a beautiful piece of writing from blogging entrepreneur, Anil Dash. 

Less whimsical but arguably more important (sorry, Anil): Bill McKibben’s fiery polemic about climate change: Three Simple Numbers That Add Up To Global Catastrophe.

More doom and gloom, as scientist David Eagleman describes Four Ways the Internet Might Let Us Down, including space weather and cyberwarfare.

The New Yorker’s Beijing-based staff writer Evan Osnos interviews designer Jonathan Mak Long on the basis of an image Long made in tribute to Steve Jobs. Some fascinating and unexpected insights into how design actually works in China

Zynga employees are unhappy. A terribly sad account of life and culture at the once hot games shop, stock price of which has plummeted since the company’s IPO. 

Track flu via Twitter? Not sure I buy it, but a natty little video makes the case of what *will* at some point be a space that enjoys sophisticated developments.